This Week in Youth Services: Funding, News and Opinion on Juvenile Justice and Child Welfare

Here is a rundown of all the funding leads, news, analysis and opinion pieces produced by The Chronicle of Social Change. Among the headlines this week:

  • A conversation with the Godfather of Finding Families
  • California’s shift on early screening/treatment funding: potential boon to counties, but also shaky legal ground
  • A national child welfare research network launched
  • A discussion with leaders and students about the right (and wrong) instances for removing children

MONEY & BUSINESS

Children’s Home Society of America and the University of North Carolina School of Social Work have formed a new research network aimed at evaluating child welfare policies.

Meanwhile, Children’s Home Society tapped veteran employee, David Bundy, to lead agency.

California is block granting of Medicaid funds for screening/treating youth, which has some advocates wondering: is that legal?

FUNDING LEADS

Texas seeking applicants for statewide Texas Healthy Adolescent Initiative, which focuses on 10- to 24-year-olds.

Massachusetts: Department of Developmental Services making small grants to train urban youths on working with younger kids and the elderly.

New York City is looking to fund alternatives to detention.

California: Department of Health & Social Services is funding community-based mental health services for 16- to 25-year olds.

California: Yolo County is supporting services to at-risk children and youth in rural areas.

California: The James Irvine Foundation is giving out $125,000 awards for state human services leaders.

California: Fresno is funding development services for young children and college readiness programs for older youth:

NEWS, OPINION, ANALYSIS

Part One and Part Two of Georgette Todd’s interview with Kevin Campbell, a chief architect of the Family Finding movement.

Teddy Lederer chronicles a discussion between grad students and child welfare advocates about the right (and wrong) times to remove children. Click here for Part One and here for Part Two.

Report: As juvenile incarceration plummeted, the proportion of juveniles heading to facilities who are minorities went up.

Publisher looking for current/former foster youth and adoptees to contribute to a cookbook!

Josh Neff: Adults deserve empathy too.

John Kelly is the editor-in-chief of The Chronicle of Social Change

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

John Kelly, Editor in Chief, The Chronicle of Social Change
About John Kelly, Editor in Chief, The Chronicle of Social Change 1181 Articles
John Kelly is editor-in-chief of The Chronicle of Social Change. Reach him at jkelly@chronicleofsocialchange.org.