Issue Brief: Supporting Youth Transitioning out of Foster Care

Amy Dworsky, Cheryl Smithgall, Mark E. Courtney

The Administration on Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, contracted with the Urban Institute and its partner Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago to plan for the next generation of evaluation activities funded by the Chafee Foster Care Independence Program (the Chafee Program). Over the past three decades, federal child welfare policy has significantly increased the availability of those supports. In 1999, the Foster Care Independence Act amended Title IV-E of the Social Security Act to create the Chafee Program. This amendment doubled the maximum amount of funds potentially available to states for independent living services and gave states greater discretion over how they use those funds. More recently, a provision in the Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 gave states an option to extend eligibility for Title IV-E foster care for youth beyond age 18 until age 21. In states that have taken this option, young people can receive an additional three years of foster care support to prepare for the transition into adulthood.

These planning activities have resulted in four issue briefs. The first brief presents a project overview. The other three briefs detail the research evidence on education, employment, and financial literacy.

Click here and here to read the briefs.

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Lisa Martine Jenkins
About Lisa Martine Jenkins 38 Articles
Lisa is the marketing coordinator for The Chronicle of Social Change and a recent graduate of University of California-Berkeley. Find her at lisamartinejenkins.com or on Twitter @lisa_m_jenkins.